Welcome to the DOC Blog!

Is Safe Scootering an Oxymoron?

Thursday, October 4th, 2018

A kick scooter is a human-powered land vehicle with a handlebar, deck and wheels, and propelled by a rider pushing off the ground. They are made of aluminum, titanium and steel. Scooters are cool with names like Powerslide Coolmax, Envy, and Razorback Graffiti. There are two different types of scooters, three wheelers, which are more […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

arthroscopic knee surgery

Miniature Surgery

Wednesday, April 18th, 2018

Arthroscopy comes from two Greek words: “artho” meaning joint and “skopein” meaning to look. So Arthroscopy means to look within the joint. Arthroscopy involves a miniature incision and pencil-sized instruments with a lens and light to magnify and illuminate inside the joint.   The DOC surgeon is able to see inside the joint, including bones, […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

golf injuries

Get in the Swing for Golf

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, more than 131,000 people were treated for golf-related injuries in 2015. Most golf injuries are the result of overuse. By repeating the same golf swing motion, stress is placed on the same muscles, tendons, and joints. The three most commonly injured areas of the body from playing […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

ankle sprain

Sprains, Strains and Automobiles to DOC

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018

For movement, your bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles must all work together in response to signals from your brain. If ligaments, tendons, or muscles are sprained or strained, movement is impaired. Knees, wrists and ankles are most susceptible to sprain and strain injuries, usually caused by a fall or accident.   Ligaments are like strong […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Signs You Dislocated Your Shoulder

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018

Your shoulder is your body’s most mobile joint. It can turn in many directions, making it susceptible to dislocate forward, backward or downward, partially or completely. A partial dislocation means the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is partially out of the cup-shaped socket (glenoid). A complete dislocation means it is completely out of […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

funny bone syndrome

Funny Bone Syndrome is No Laughing Matter

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018

Have you ever hit the inside of your elbow in just the right spot and felt a tingling, weird pain? That’s your funny bone, which got its nickname because of that funny feeling.   The funny bone is not really a bone at all, but rather the ulnar nerve.   At the elbow, the ulnar […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

tennis elbow

DOC’s Grand Slam Tennis Elbow Treatment

Thursday, January 4th, 2018

DOC’s Grand Slam Tennis Elbow Treatment Nearly 18 million people played tennis in the U.S. in 2015. Only 1 in 20 or 5% of all tennis players get tennis elbow.   Most people who are diagnosed with tennis elbow have never swung a tennis racquet.   Tennis elbow, lateral epicondylitis, is a painful condition of […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Skier’s, Gamekeeper’s or Sprained Thumb

Friday, November 17th, 2017

A stable thumb is essential for pinch and grasp movement. The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is located in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint where the thumb meets the hand. Ligaments are soft tissue structures that connect two bones to make a stable joint. The purpose of the UCL is to keep the thumb stable in order […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Mysterious, Moveable and Removable Ganglion Cyst

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

Ganglion cysts are the most common mass or lump in the hand. They are not cancerous and usually harmless. They occur in various locations, but most frequently develop on the back of the wrist. These fluid-filled cysts can appear, disappear and change size. If the cyst is painful, interferes with function, or has an unacceptable […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Shocking Burners and Stingers

Friday, October 6th, 2017

Burners, also called stingers, are injuries that occur when nerves in the neck and shoulder are stretched or compressed after impact during contact or collision sports. They are named for the burning or stinging pain that spreads from the shoulder to the hand. A burner can feel like an electric shock or lightning bolt down […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Arthritis of the Shoulder

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017

More than 50 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis, according to the National Health Interview Survey.   The number of people estimated to have doctor-diagnosed arthritis by 2040 is more than 78 million. Arthritis is the number one cause of disability.   The most common form of […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Conventional vs. Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is successful in relieving shoulder joint pain and improving arm mobility. About 53,000 people in the U.S. have shoulder replacement surgery each year, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.   The shoulder is made up of three bones: upper […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

elbow injuries in the throwing athlete

Elbow Injuries in the Throwing Athlete

Monday, July 17th, 2017

Overhand throwing places extremely high stresses on the elbow, which can lead to serious overuse injury. Overuse injuries develop when an athletic movement is repeated during play and when these periods of play are so frequent that the body does not have enough time to rest and heal. Although throwing injuries in the elbow most […]

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

women icing shoulder

Thawing Frozen Shoulder

Monday, June 12th, 2017

Frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis, causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder and the shoulder becomes difficult to move. Frozen shoulder occurs in about 2% of the general population, affecting people between 40 and 60 and women more than men.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Playing the piano

Dupuytren Contracture

Monday, May 8th, 2017

Dupuytren’s contracture is a thickening and shortening of the deep supporting tissue of the hand (palmar fascia), found above the bones and tendons and below the skin of the hand. The thickening and shortening below the skin surface causes lumps on the palm of the hand that results in constricted fingers bent down toward the palm, preventing the hand from opening.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Direct Orthopedic Care, Specialist Skills Without the High ER Bill!

GO DIRECT
top-arrow